Jump to content

Welcome! 


Where classical school and homeschool teachers talk.

 

 

Discussion Starts Here.

For the Children's Sake.

Learn from Others.

Add Your Voice to the Conversation.

Glad You Are Here.

Give Us Your Question.

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Jessica Winder

    The PGMAPT Paradigm for Classical Education

    I am curious to know more about how they have been able to facilitate this design into the school that they teach at. Are they still modifying scope and sequences? What does it look like on a weekly or even daily basis? How can we best facilitate this in our homeschool? We do not live near a classical academy, but I want to allow my children to have access to as much of this as possible.
  3. Jessica Winder

    The Original Quest Story?

    By whom and when was it referred to as such?
  4. Yesterday
  5. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  6. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  8. Check out our newest Scholé Blog post by Kimberlynn Curles about pursuing scholé in the midst of personal suffering. Such encouragement! Come back here and discuss it after you read.
  9. Last week
  10. Cheryl Floyd

    Short but ultimate classical book list

    In addition we are slowly reviewing Tolkien’s essay, “On Fairy-Stories,” and I am reading Tending the Heart of Virtue by Vigen Guroian.
  11. Cheryl Floyd

    What Should We Read?

    I've really only interacted with the Esolen version. But I am using a kindle version, "Cary's translation" to read out loud to my children, and a large "Chartwell Books, Inc." edition with beautiful art for looking at as I read to them. I can't find my Esolen! However, I highly recommend the Great Courses series on The Divine Comedy. The two professors obviously love their work and give amazing insights into Dante's ideas, form, and structure. I used my Audible credit to listen to it rather than purchased it through Great Courses. I have a video set of Esolen also explaining it, but I haven't sat down to go through it yet. Maybe I'll do that a little at a time with the kids too.
  12. JTB_5

    What Should We Read?

    I have read the translation of Inferno by Dorothy Sayers. The notes are wonderful, but for me it introduced me to numerous vocabulary words I'd never heard of before (which made for some difficulty in the flow of reading).
  13. JTB_5

    What Should We Read?

    A friend of mine recommends the Anthony Esolen translations. The Everyman's Library all-in-one version by Mandelbaum is supposed to be good as well, but I've not read either of them myself.
  14. Donald Hess

    What Should We Read?

    I'm considering reading Dante's Divine Comedy for the first time. My library has several translations, including an older one by Longfellow and a recent paraphrase by Clive James. Does anyone have a recommendation on a translation that I should consider?
  15. JTB_5

    What Should We Read?

    Wouldn't it be awesome if a movement toward read-aloud book clubs started?
  16. Dante's seven circles---hahaha I saw the Alexandria picture, too. My daughter and I have been reading Plutarch's life of Julius Caesar this term, and it mentions this fire, so I had to discuss it with her. It's hard for kids today, with everything all digital and ubiquitous, to imagine one fire destroying a manuscript forever. Of course it makes you want to burst into tears!
  17. KarenG

    What Should We Read?

    That's a good point--reading aloud. Many works of literature were intended to be shared orally anyway, and speaking the words adds another dimension to the way we experience them. Rhyme and rhythm, and thinks like assonance or sibilance (why does my software say that is misspelled???) can only be appreciated that way.
  18. Cheryl Floyd

    Jean Valjean and Dante

    How young do you think you can start to introduce classic literature? How do you introduce it? Do you use an abridged version with lots of art first? Do you then have middle schoolers read a more wordy, but still abridged version? And then finally do you tackle the full text in high school? At what age do you think you could read a few lines, explaining as you go to say, 6-8 year-olds? I am reading Les Mis for myself, but I think my kids could listen to the audio and follow along. I am reading out loud to them, Dante' Inferno, I think it's going ok. We are going really slow and reviewing before and after each read. The language is so beautiful. Any thoughts?
  19. you know you are a classical educator when... Every answer to a child's question is question, every story references Homer, and every threat of discipline references Dante's seven circles.
  20. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  21. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  22. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  23. Well then... I guess it's just twice as upsetting 🔥📚😯
  24. Cheryl Floyd

    What Should We Read?

    Oh, I agree with this. Even for myself, lately, as I am trying to get through difficult reads, I plug my ears and sort of read out loud under my breath. It really helps me concentrate, though I'm sure I look crazy, but I need to hear nothing else but the words on the page in my head - plugging my ears has that effect.
  25. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  26. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a password protected forum. Enter Password
  27. I saw the picture in both posts, Patrick.
  1. Load more activity
×