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Found 2 results

  1. Often times as educators, we are so excited to present course content we forget there’s an overwhelming need to teach students grades 7-9 (and beyond) scholarship skills. Students this age must not only transition from the pedagogical approaches prevalent in the Grammar stage courses, but also transition to more mature ways of organizing and scheduling their priorities, deadlines, and assignments. There is a necessary discipline that must accompany advanced study including (but not limited to): note taking — Cornell notes are an excellent skill set and tool to provide to students regular adhereance to deadlines — missing a deadline should be an extremely rare occurrence (maybe four times per year) Updating and maintaining a personal calendar — students should begin to schedule their activities, assignments and projects learning to read literature for more than the five parts of a story — students should begin to ask the deeper questions involving theme, symbolism, and author argument Formatting — students should begin to follow the guidelines of standard MLA formatting style for all papers and typed submissions studying is not the same as homework — students should realize that homework is something that is assigned to them; and studying is something they assign to themselves. Organization— students should plan to comb through their papers, notes and assignments, in regular intervals (daily, weekly, monthly) Cornell Notetaking Strategy.pdf Cornell-Notes-Template_0.pdf
  2. How do you think we should go about reading the great books? What demeanor? What preparation? What pace? See what Josh Gibbs suggests here.
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