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JennA817

Liturgical and Embodied Learning

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I posted this in the Upper Grammar forum and realized I should have posted here.  As I'm thinking about these topics, I'm wondering how appropriate is to ask my 6th grader to contribute to the decision making of the rhythms of the days, weeks, etc.  I get a LOT of pushback when I try to do new things, and wonder if involving her in the process might be appropriate and helpful.  We haven't done these things from day 1, so it's changing course mid-stream.  I definitely have a vision of what I'd like our days to look like that is VERY far from the reality of what it is right now.

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Hi Jenn!

This is a great question. I think there is definitely a place for giving students some ownership of the daily routine, and this should increase as they get older. On the other hand, there are times when you explain the new thing, listen to and respond to objections, and then calmly persevere with your plan. This is a great opportunity to model the idea that "education is repentance" for your students. "I am learning right along with (or just ahead of), and as I have studied and learned more, I understand that this new way of doing things is going to serve our family better." With all that said, when you are making a radical change to your daily routine, it might be wise to just change one thing every few days until you get closer to your ideal, recognizing that even that will change as you go. But there might also be some merit in a clean slate approach: declare a week's holiday for your students, take that time to get your new routine plan in order, and then come back from holiday to your new routine. I have done both of these things at various times over the years, and both can be effective.

If you have more specific questions about implementing particular facets of a liturgical approach, please ask!

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In our faith tradition we change things very slowly. And when I speak to my priest about the things I am trying to change in myself, he encourages me, "Slowly, slowly." Some people LOVE change, and some people LOATHE change, and some people just don't like when they aren't the ones making the decision for change (me!). So, maybe as suggested, you change slowly, or you take a week off to reset the schedule. If your daughter is doing well with her schedule, maybe consider releasing her to be independent. But if she is not doing well, bringing to her attention the areas that are not working may help her realize a change is needed. Asking for her input on what could make things work better is loving, but if she is resistant, you may have to institute the changes anyway. As our students get older it is harder to "just do it". I see I need to include my children in on the decisions that affect them. They need to want to participate or else the work is so much harder. Trying to persuade them is more involved the older they get. I found with my two oldest sons, when they hit about 16, it was nearly impossible for me to persuade them to own more or different work. If it wasn't their idea, it was not going to be done well. If you have ideas on addressing that, I'm all ears!

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Thanks ladies!  This gives me some good things to think about.  We have Thanksgiving Break next week (Praise God!!!), and I have begun to put a bug in her ear that I'd like to change some things after the break.  She is resisting "Why are you always trying to change things?" To which I was grateful for the lessons in "education is repentance"!  I didn't quite get that concept until you shared it in that context and it's beginning to make more sense. 

We'll have lots of time in the car driving to visit family to have conversations. This year is challenging with a toddler who needs all my attention and an 11 yo who is craving independence (yet still needs me more than she will sometimes admit).  I sometimes feel left out in the cold and want to find ways to make sure we connect at various points in the day.  Naptime is key, but oh so very unpredictable and so very limited! 

Cheryl, your comments made me think about when I used to teach the topic of "Change Management" to business school students in a previous life.  I'll have to go back and dig out those lectures and see if there's anything there that will be helpful here for me or you.  I always told my students that their management class was not just for school, but for life.  Maybe I should practice some of it! 

Thanks again!

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On 11/14/2018 at 8:12 AM, JennA817 said:

I used to teach the topic of "Change Management" to business school students in a previous life.  I'll have to go back and dig out those lectures and see if there's anything there that will be helpful here for me or you.  I always told my students that their management class was not just for school, but for life.  Maybe I should practice some of it! 

Thanks again!

I'm interested in hearing how you would apply management techniques. Please do share if/when you come up with your ideas and applications!

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