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Donald Hess

Help wanted: Classical approach to high school level human anatomy

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I am a retired physician who is planning on teaching a new, high school level course on human anatomy & physiology at a homeschool co-op. I'd like to connect with someone who teaches human A&P in a classical setting primarily to learn what materials they use for the basic content and how they integrate the subject with other disciplines. Thank you for your suggestions.
Edited by Donald Hess

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On 12/4/2018 at 4:20 PM, Donald Hess said:
I am a retired physician who is planning on teaching a new, high school level course on human anatomy & physiology at a homeschool co-op. I'd like to connect with someone who teaches human A&P in a classical setting primarily to learn what materials they use for the basic content and how they integrate the subject with other disciplines. Thank you for your suggestions.

Dr. Donald, you may be interested in two Christian curriculums I found fascinating. This one is Biology, but I love Dr. Wise's approach. He sees all of science as a reflection of God so he doesn't start with the cell and work up to the animal, he starts with the macro and how it points to a creator and then works towards the micro. He says it is better to go from the known to the unknown or the familiar to the unfamiliar. https://compassclassroom.com/?s=biology 

This DVD series is with Dr. David Menton, https://www.christianbook.com/body-of-evidence-8/pd/301370?event=EBRN  and it is anatomy and physiology. 

I think this is so wonder that you are offering to teach this class! I wish you lived near Shreveport! Thank you so much for giving of your time in this way!

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Cheryl, Thank you, thank you for sending these suggestions! I look forward to checking them out. Macro to micro...an intriguing way to orient things. I find it remarkable that once I agreed to teach this course, all kinds of possibilities have opened up for me, one thing has led to another. I initially began by wondering how da Vinci's famous Vitruvian man might be helpful as I prepared. I was fascinated to learn that Leonardo was not only an artist but an accomplished anatomist. I have a book of his anatomical work and it is like I'm looking at the illustrations in Gray's Anatomy. Notable it is that I attended a medical school that called itself the "home of humanist medicine". Why is that I am only now aware of Leonardo's significant contributions to art & science of anatomy?

One other thing that I'd like to share is that Vitruvian Man is so called because it was based on the writings of a Roman named Vitruvius, an architect who was interested in the proportions of both buildings and the human body. Vitruvius is also known for the Vitruvian Triad, three important principles in the design of a building: firmitatis, utilitatis, and venustatis (stability, utility & beauty). I have a feeling that this triad will be useful construct as I teach this course.

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I really ought to have called you Dr. Hess, forgive me. 

That is beautiful! How exciting to find these amazing connections. Education is a stable, useful, beautiful thing if we let it be. :) 

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20 hours ago, Cheryl Floyd said:

Education is a stable, useful, beautiful thing if we let it be

Nicely said, Cheryl! And feel free to call me Donald. I've always wanted to be a teacher and was encouraged when I learned that doctor, from its Latin root, also means teacher. So I'm honored to have entered this community of classical educators as a colleague.

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On 12/19/2018 at 3:08 PM, Donald Hess said:

One other thing that I'd like to share is that Vitruvian Man is so called because it was based on the writings of a Roman named Vitruvius, an architect who was interested in the proportions of both buildings and the human body. Vitruvius is also known for the Vitruvian Triad, three important principles in the design of a building: firmitatis, utilitatis, and venustatis (stability, utility & beauty). I have a feeling that this triad will be useful construct as I teach this course.

My students are always intrigued when I teach them about Vitruvius and point out that the character with the same name in The Lego Movie is named after him--which only makes sense, since he's a "master builder."

(Vitruvius also wrote about education. This was an interesting article by a classicist on more Lego Movie connections: https://seaneaston1.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/lego-vitruvius-and-roman-vitruvius-on-the-importance-of-parents-educating-children/.)

Donald, would you happen to have access to old talks from ACCS conferences? One of the science teachers at my school, Darla McDonald, has given a couple of talks over the past few years on teaching science.

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Thanks for letting me know about the classical connections to The Lego Movie, Patrick, and the link to the article. I'll check it out, but maybe I should see the movie first!

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