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JTB_5

Reading Recharge

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We're approaching the Christmas holidays where I teach, which means a few days respite from the daily routines of the classroom and preparation. There are lots of ways to use the extra time, and reading a good book seems to me to be a good choice among many.

If you are planning to read a book over the Christmas holidays, why don't you share it with us in this thread?

Also, do you have a book that you go to time and again when you just need to recharge your imaginative energies?

 

I'm planning on reading a second translation of the Iliad to keep up the project I began at the end of summer, to read the Iliad throughout the year in several translations.

The book I go to time and again is The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. I know that you could consider that four books, but it really is one story (I suppose I should throw in Silmarillion, too on that logic!)

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I'm reading Sense and Sensibility and A Christmas Carol over the holiday break. And now you are making me want to add LOTR...

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A Christmas Carol is a lovely choice. I'm also thinking of reading Wind in the Willows, as I love the Dulce Domum chapter as a Christmas vignette. 

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I just finished Laurus by Eugene Vodolazkin and Daniel DeRonda by George Eliot as an audio book, apart from my steady diet of nonfiction. I also attended the funeral of a staunch atheist this week, and I am desperate for some light, escapist reading. I will probably reread one of Elizabeth George's  Lynley mysteries, also sometime entirely frivolous and escapist, and maybe something by Jane Austen. I'll be posting a "what I've read this year" post on my blog before the end of December, and I think it's going to make me cringe.

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I'm pretty sure you are referring to what you are personally reading to re-charge and take advantage of time off, but on the off chance are you speaking of what to read to your students during this weird - we don't have enough time to start something else, you would be too distracted by the upcoming break - time? Even if not, is there something you read to your students on a consistent basis or your children during down times, or breaks, or Christmas? 

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46 minutes ago, Cheryl Floyd said:

I'm pretty sure you are referring to what you are personally reading to re-charge and take advantage of time off, but on the off chance are you speaking of what to read to your students during this weird - we don't have enough time to start something else, you would be too distracted by the upcoming break - time? Even if not, is there something you read to your students on a consistent basis or your children during down times, or breaks, or Christmas? 

I was thinking personally, rather than reading to students, but that is also a good question. I know that some of our teachers read Christmas themed stories (the only one I can think of is "The Birds for Christmas" by Mark Richards, which is more for older students). During down times in my Logic courses I've read Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, since it has some thinking puzzles in the chapters. I also have read The Man Who Was Thursday, by Chesterton. At Grammar school lunches I've often read aloud Wise Words, by Peter Leithart. I bet there are a lot of good books people choose to read during down times. I'll ask what books our teachers have recommended to students to read over the breaks.

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I always reach for fiction before anything else, so I've picked up A Tale of Two Cities to read over the break. It's one I've not gotten around to over the years. 

I simply want my students to read something, anything over the break. I encourage them to read what is enjoyable to them. Unfortunately, there isn't much of a reading-for-pleasure amongst the students at my school, but I'm trying to change that.

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