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KarenG

What will you read in 2019?

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I thought someone else might have already started  post like this one, and I popped in here to share, but it looks like I'm the first one. Too much partying and holidaying?

Now that it's January 2, and all of 2018's reading is done and dusted, what are you planning to read first?

I'm diving into three books, at least two of which will probably take most of the year to read. First is Loving to Know by Esther Meek. It's a nearly-500-pages book on epistemology, and if the title makes you think of Charlotte Mason's concept that "education is the science of relations," well, I think that, too. What could be more fun? Next up is Education in Plato's Republic by Bernard Bosanquet. I love it that Charlotte Mason assigned this book to her senior high school girls. And my third start, which won't take so long to get through, I don't think, is Josh Gibb's new book, How to be Unlucky.  The last book I finished in 2018 was a Classical Academic Press title--Awakening Wonder by Stephen Turley. I really liked it, and will probably reread it soon.

But there are twelve whole months in front of us to fill with reading...what will you pick up first?

(Full disclosure: I'm totally hoping to glean some more ideas for my own to be read list!)

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Hi Karen,

Great question, timely too as I just added a few more books to my reading list. Whether I actually read all of them time will tell. First I'll need to finish the ones I started in 218.

Here is my short list: Pride and Prejudice (Jane Austen), Theory of Life, an essay in Selected Poetry and Prose of Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Donald Stauffer), and A Short History of Anatomy and Physiology (Charles Singer). 

You will really enjoy Longing to Know. I like the way the author starts with a proposition and then builds her argument as narrative in chapter format. And yes, now that I think of it, she emphasizes the importance of relationships. She also does a fine job distinguishing certainty as opposed to confidence. Her description of the epistemological process correlated very closely to the diagnostic process in medicine.

Regards, Don

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I love this question, Karen! I am picking up Dante's Inferno with a special eye towards teaching and parenting. I am wondering about some of the following questions as I read it.

What is Dante doing, saying, and experiencing as he walks through hell? 

What is suffering?

What is punishment?

What is judgment?

What is revenge?

What is love?

How do I know I am experiencing love, even in less than pleasant circumstances?

How do I walk through hell?

What is Virgil doing & saying as he leads Dante through hell?

What does it mean to lead someone through hell/suffering/_______?

Is leading about keeping those we follow from hell or walking with them through hell?

What does teaching someone how to suffer have to do with parenting? With teaching?

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I will confess I am not a great reader! I do not plan out what I will read. Partly this is because I am still homeschooling 5 children and that is who I attempt planning for. And partly because my personal reading list is dictated by my college classes. It is sad, so far I have only read two books in the two semesters I've had. The rest of my reading has either been plays or excerpts. I read Peter Kreeft's Socratic Logic and Adler's 1940 How to Read a Book. I am currently finishing The Great Gatsby because of Circe Institute's Closereads group. I hope to read and finish Island of the World. I have high hopes I could Silence by Shusaku Endo. And I would love to finish Anna Karenina. To start in 2019 I would like to work through Ten Ways to Destroy Your Child's Imagination by Esolen and Beauty for Truth's Sake. I have started both of those previously and never finished them. :(  Also I'd like to complete at least level 1 if not level 2 of ClassicalU. 

How do you all schedule homeschooling/classroom teaching/life/ and personal reading? I feel woefully under-read.

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I'm still deciding which old books to read this year. As far as newer ones go, Cal Newport's Digital Minimalism and Alan Jacobs's The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis are on my list. With my kids, I'm reading The Wind in the Willows, which I somehow never got around to reading during my own childhood. I also recently picked up a copy of Consider This, which I'm looking forward to 🙂.

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3 hours ago, Patrick Halbrook said:

he Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis

I have not heard of that book before. I have recently become highly fascinated with everything related to Christian Humanism. Would love to hear what you end up thinking about it. 

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4 hours ago, Jennifer Dow said:

I have not heard of that book before. I have recently become highly fascinated with everything related to Christian Humanism. Would love to hear what you end up thinking about it. 

I was immediately hooked after reading this book review: https://www.nationalreview.com/magazine/2018/10/29/the-year-of-our-lord-1943-book-review/

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