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I'd like to see more conversations on this forum. I think it is worthwhile.

Therefore, what have you been reading lately in relation to education? Are you enjoying it? Is it drudgery and you are simply wading through it? What have you read more than once and yet still continue to glean from it? 

Cheers,

Shannon

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Hi Shannon. I think this is a great question. I especially like the part about "what have you read more than once." If it's the right book, rereading it several times will do more for you than constantly moving on to "the next new thing." I've been homeschooling for over 20 years (my only student still at home will be in 8th grade next year, so I've still got a ways to go, too). The books that I have more than once are:

All six of Charlotte Mason's volumes (currently reading volume 1)

Norms and Noblity

I'm currently rereading Poetic Knowledge by James Taylor and The Liberal Arts Tradition by Clark and Jain.

I have a backlog of books that are education-related that I want to read...next up, as soon as I can make room in my reading for it, is "The Education of the Young in the Republic of Plato."

This is not drudgery for me...I absolutely love it. If it were drudgery, I don't think I would do it.

 

 

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Oooh, I have never read Poetic Knowledge or The Education of the Young...Now I have more to add to my expanding reading list! Thank you!

I love Charlotte Mason's works too!

(If you are the Karen I think you are, your book Consider This was fantastic! I love bridging the gap between Mason and the Classical realm of schooling. )

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Thank you for kind words! Yes, I'm Karen Glass. I used the short version I used elsewhere without realizing the full version might be better. I'll have to see if it's possible to change it.

Expanding reading lists are the only way to fly...

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I’m reading A Charlotte Mason Companion by Karen Andreola, The Achievement Gap by Tony Wagner, Mrs Oswald Chambers by Michele Ule, Bonhoeffer by Eric Metaxas and Jayber Crow by Wendell Berry.

 

I do enjoy reading these books and most other books that are about education. I have a tendency to want to skip to the things that are IMMEDIATELY applicable but I know I must remember, “first things first” a la C.S. Lewis. ?

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  Oh, the TBR stack? 

  Karen, thank you so very much for writing "....Consider This", which I had the pleasure of reading this spring.

  I do have a little more time to commit to my stack this summer, and am looking forward to my stack! June's readings include: Hannah Coulter and A Place in Time, Mere Motherhood, Iliad & Odyssey, Homeric Moments, In the Beginning... -Pope Benedict XVI, Plato: The Great Philosopher-Educator in conjunction with Seeking Scholé series on Classical U, and The Bones of S. Peter - John Evangelist Walsh.  

  I'm sure there will be additions as the TBR door revolves!?

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On 6/8/2018 at 5:09 AM, Lisa Mayeux said:

  Oh, the TBR stack? 

  Karen, thank you so very much for writing "....Consider This", which I had the pleasure of reading this spring.

 

Aww. That was nice to hear! Thank you for telling me!

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I recently finished, The Theory of Education in the United States by Albert J. Nock, and highly recommend it.  I also recommend, The Underground History of American Education by John Taylor Gatto.  Both books delve into the theory and history of American education, and are not to be missed.

https://www.amazon.com/Theory-Education-United-States/dp/1610160940/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1530627766&sr=1-1&keywords=the+theory+of+education+in+the+united+states

https://www.amazon.com/Underground-History-American-Education/dp/B00FRJRNHM/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1530628099&sr=1-4&keywords=underground+history+of+american+education

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Great question! I'm enjoying several books currently that have made me think deeply about education, although they are not specifically about education: The Divine Comedy, for a seminary course I'm taking, and A Distant Place, by Wendell Berry for a small book club made up of college students and young adults. In my book basket to read this summer: Know and Tell, by Karen Glass,  Norms and Nobility, by David Hicks (this will be a very slow read!)

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I am trying to be more faithful to getting through all the courses on Level 1 of ClassicalU. A variety of Maria Montessori’s books in preparation for certification next year. I am taking the Roman Roads Great Books Challenge for Parents. I will do Romans Early Christianity  and its related books. I will also read alongside my son doing Roman Roads 3rd year Christianity. 

I will try and get to Consider This once again as I begin to delve into Montessori theory. I love Wendell Berry but he just breaks my heart sometimes. 

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Alicia,

I love that you are taking the great book challenge--what a good idea from our friends at Roman Roads. I would love to hear the way you think Montessori overlaps with classical education generally.

CP

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I would like to know this, too! I'm only peripherally familiar with Montessori's ideas and have no idea what they look like past preschool level.

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I'm currently reading Norms and Nobility, and finished Know and Tell this past summer. I'm waiting to get it back from my daughter's English teacher so I can read it again!  An essay I read just about every year is "The Loss of the University" by Wendell Berry.  I currently work in Higher Ed, so this is a read that speaks to my heart and breaks it too!  I have so many books on my TBR pile it's a tad overwhelming, but I will get to them...someday! I have 17 more years of homeschooling ahead of me so there's plenty of time!

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On 10/23/2018 at 11:14 AM, kweitz said:

I am very interested in reading Berry's essay, as a big fan of his fiction. This topic of higher education has occupied many family dinners. I just came across this article from Circe which I found so interesting; it has many of the ideas we have discussed as a family.

https://www.circeinstitute.org/blog/hannah-coulter-hard-questions-education

I wondered about Berry's ideology concerning education when I read Hannah Coulter as well. I wonder, if like in To Kill a Mockingbird, he exemplified the shift in education from traditional to modern. I wonder if his critique is concerning what modern education inculcates. I don't think he's entirely against education where it can improve a family or a family's situation, or a community by community members. I think like Flannery O'Conner, he is noting the modernist idea that elevating oneself is power, knowledge is power, and personal power is our prime objective. Before the modern era, communities improved together as well as maintained and respected the past where it was worthy. 

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Cheryl, I agree - I don't think Berry is completely against higher education. But I think he is warning folks to count the cost, particularly in the way higher education today is structured. I still haven't read the essay, but I do wonder if part of the problem is that so much of higher education today is really more like glorified vocational training, which then forces the grads into the suburbs and cities where their highly specialized skills are in demand. There is some interesting scholarship on Wendell Berry's vision of education going on. Did you catch the interview with Jeffrey Bilbro and Jack Baker at Forma on this? https://www.circeinstitute.org/podcast/wendell-berry-and-higher-education-jack-baker-and-jeffrey-bilbro-forma

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