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Often times as educators, we are so excited to present course content we forget there’s an overwhelming need to teach students grades 7-9 (and beyond) scholarship skills.  Students this age must not only transition from the pedagogical approaches prevalent in the Grammar stage courses, but also transition to more mature ways of organizing and scheduling their priorities, deadlines, and assignments.  There is a necessary discipline that must accompany advanced study including (but not limited to): 

  • note taking — Cornell notes are an excellent skill set and tool to provide to students
  • regular adhereance to deadlines — missing a deadline should be an extremely rare occurrence (maybe four times per year)
  • Updating and maintaining a personal calendar — students should begin to schedule their activities, assignments and projects
  • learning to read literature for more than the five parts of a story — students should begin to ask the deeper questions involving theme, symbolism, and author argument
  • Formatting — students should begin to follow the guidelines of standard MLA formatting style for all papers and typed submissions
  • studying is not the same as homework — students should realize that homework is something that is assigned to them; and studying is something they assign to themselves.  
  • Organization— students should plan to comb through their papers, notes and assignments, in regular intervals (daily, weekly, monthly)

 

Cornell Notetaking Strategy.pdf

Cornell-Notes-Template_0.pdf

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On 5/25/2018 at 5:01 AM, jhodge said:

Often times as educators, we are so excited to present course content we forget there’s an overwhelming need to teach students grades 7-9 (and beyond) scholarship skills.  Students this age must not only transition from the pedagogical approaches prevalent in the Grammar stage courses, but also transition to more mature ways of organizing and scheduling their priorities, deadlines, and assignments.  There is a necessary discipline that must accompany advanced study including (but not limited to): 

  • note taking — Cornell notes are an excellent skill set and tool to provide to students
  • regular adhereance to deadlines — missing a deadline should be an extremely rare occurrence (maybe four times per year)
  • Updating and maintaining a personal calendar — students should begin to schedule their activities, assignments and projects
  • learning to read literature for more than the five parts of a story — students should begin to ask the deeper questions involving theme, symbolism, and author argument
  • Formatting — students should begin to follow the guidelines of standard MLA formatting style for all papers and typed submissions
  • studying is not the same as homework — students should realize that homework is something that is assigned to them; and studying is something they assign to themselves.  
  • Organization— students should plan to comb through their papers, notes and assignments, in regular intervals (daily, weekly, monthly)

 

Cornell Notetaking Strategy.pdf

Cornell-Notes-Template_0.pdf

This is a very helpful post. Thank you so much for sharing it. If this is the need in high school to prepare for college and career, do you have thoughts on what pre-skills or ways we can begin introducing these in younger grades? 

And how can we rehibilitate a student who has not had these skills deceloped by, 16-17 years old? Is there a fast-track?

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