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Patrick Halbrook

Doctoral Programs for Classical Teachers/Administrators?

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Is pursuing a Ph.D. or Ed.D. worthwhile for educators in K-12 classical & Christian schools? This is a question I've been thinking over for a number of years. I teach History and Rhetoric and am potentially interested in eventually serving in an administrative capacity. My current degrees are in Biblical Studies & Liberal Studies (B.A.) and History (M.A.). I've spent a lot of time looking at various doctoral programs in Education, History, and Theology at a variety of schools, and would love to pursue a doctoral degree (my main interest is the History & Philosophy of Education). I am wondering, however, 1) if it would be worth the time and money on a practical level (I'd certainly enjoy it on a personal level), and if so, 2) what schools or programs would provide the most value to someone working in a K-12 classical & Christian school, in particular 3) what is the value of studying something more theoretical vs. something more pragmatic like an Ed.D. program.

Thoughts?

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I am interested in this question as well! I am a homeschool mom emerita currently pursuing a M.A. in Christian and Classical Studies at Knox Seminary. My daughter and I are working to establish a university model classical school in our area, and I am wondering if I should consider a further program when this one is done. I am interested in literature, English, or classics as opposed to and Ed.D.

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Patrick and Kathy,

I hope to provide a fuller answer later, but I do not recommend an Ed.D., as most all of those programs steeped in the progressive model and are very light on the history and philosophy of education. In my opinion, they will do little to help prepare one for a career in the leadership of classical, Christian education... Pax, C Perrin

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I think several schools offer a PhD in Humanities or Liberal Studies.

Non-tertiary educators should probably ask their administrators about career advancement requirements for their schools.

 

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I agree with Dr. Perin, but I am also online for a humanities degree at Faulkner University because they have a heavy classical emphasis and a Great Books program. University of Dallas is also growing their Classical Education degrees. If you are interested and want to, look for programs emphasizing the classics/great books. Unfortunately education as a degree has not been classically modified in enough colleges. Perhaps that what we or our children will do in the future!

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We have a faculty member doing a PhD at Faulkner right now through a distance program. He speaks well of it. We also have a faculty member who did an MA at the University of Dallas and he speaks highly of their program and teachers. Given their comments, I'd second Cheryl's comments. 

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I looked into educational degree programs and came to the conclusion that an Ed.D, for example, wasn't at all going to give me what I wanted. Since I'm not looking to enhance my professional standing, I just want to learn, I ended up deciding that self-education was the best option for me. But I would love to be a part of a group delving into the theory of classical education and universal educational principles.

The University of Dallas seems to be stepping up their game for this--they are even hiring a Charlotte Mason consultant to work with their professors to learn her methods!

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